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The Farmhouse2019-02-04T10:59:13+00:00

The Villa

The Villa Marmini lies on the outskirts of Volterra, a city which is in the heart of Tuscany, equidistant from Pisa, Florence and Siena. It is immersed in a landscape that maintains much of its centuries old beauty. It is near the medieval city of San Gimignano and within easy reach of the Etruscan coastline. The agriturismo Villa Marmini extends over 5 hectares, and is approximately 1½ kilometers from the historical center of Volterra. Our property contains the only Etruscan tombs in this area, which may be entered. These shallow underground tombs belong to the ancient Etruscan necropolis, and were excavated by previous owners of Villa Marmini. The excavated cinerary urns are now in the Etruscan Museum of Volterra and the Archeological Museum of Florence. Some of the urn fragments are still visible in the ancient wall which encircles the villa’s courtyard.. We may also serve you meals here of typical Tuscan cuisine, always upon specific reservation. You may walk among the fruit trees, grape vines, chestnut trees, and stroll in the woods where we tend the goats and beehives.

The Villa Marmini lies on the outskirts of Volterra, a city which is in the heart of Tuscany, equidistant from Pisa, Florence and Siena. It is immersed in a landscape that maintains much of its centuries old beauty. It is near the medieval city of San Gimignano and within easy reach of the Etruscan coastline. The agriturismo Villa Marmini extends over 5 hectares, and is approximately 1½ kilometers from the historical center of Volterra. Our property contains the only Etruscan tombs in this area, which may be entered. These shallow underground tombs belong to the ancient Etruscan necropolis, and were excavated by previous owners of Villa Marmini. The excavated cinerary urns are now in the Etruscan Museum of Volterra and the Archeological Museum of Florence. Some of the urn fragments are still visible in the ancient wall which encircles the villa’s courtyard.. We may also serve you meals here of typical Tuscan cuisine, always upon specific reservation. You may walk among the fruit trees, grape vines, chestnut trees, and stroll in the woods where we tend the goats and beehives.

The History of the Villa

The Villa Marmini agriturismo, situated in the picturesque Tuscan countryside, has a unique history. In 1732, the Canonico Pietro Franceschini donated a collection of funerary urns to Volterra. The urns with their sculpted relief are of great artistic value. These urns were part of his private collection, and gave rise to the name, house made of “marbles” nowadays called Marmini. These urns came from the heart of the Portone necropolis, perhaps one of the most extensive burial areas in ancient Volterra. The excavated cinerary urns are now in the Etruscan Museum of Volterra and the Archeological Museum of Florence. In fact “Marmini” refers to the limestone and alabaster rock fragments, including Etruscan urns, called marmi, which were utilized to construct the villa.

The Villa Marmini agriturismo, situated in the picturesque Tuscan countryside, has a unique history. In 1732, the Canonico Pietro Franceschini donated a collection of funerary urns to Volterra. The urns with their sculpted relief are of great artistic value. These urns were part of his private collection, and gave rise to the name, house made of “marbles” nowadays called Marmini. These urns came from the heart of the Portone necropolis, perhaps one of the most extensive burial areas in ancient Volterra. The excavated cinerary urns are now in the Etruscan Museum of Volterra and the Archeological Museum of Florence. In fact “Marmini” refers to the limestone and alabaster rock fragments, including Etruscan urns, called marmi, which were utilized to construct the villa.

Funerary urns were common during the Hellenistic period, and also the Imperial age, of the Etruscans. More than ¾ of those urns now on view at the Guarnacci Museum, came from the Portone necropolis. These excavations occurring centuries ago were often led by local scholars or enthusiasts, excavations were not done systematically and so unfortunately, we have little information relating to them. The scholars did not document the layout of the burial chamber contents, they were mainly interested in finding precious objects for their own private collections, or to sell. The only two tombs that can now be visited, upon the agriturismo property, bear witness to this period of exploration taking place from about 1730 to the beginning of the 1900s.

Funerary urns were common during the Hellenistic period, and also the Imperial age, of the Etruscans. More than ¾ of those urns now on view at the Guarnacci Museum, came from the Portone necropolis. These excavations occurring centuries ago were often led by local scholars or enthusiasts, excavations were not done systematically and so unfortunately, we have little information relating to them. The scholars did not document the layout of the burial chamber contents, they were mainly interested in finding precious objects for their own private collections, or to sell. The only two tombs that can now be visited, upon the agriturismo property, bear witness to this period of exploration taking place from about 1730 to the beginning of the 1900s.

The Etruscan Tombs

The first Etruscan tomb is characterized by a single circular underground hypogeum (burial chamber), whose access is through a steeply inclined corridor (dromos). Benches have been carved into the soft sedimentary stone, the funerary urns and vases were placed upon these benches. A large central pillar helps support the chambers’ vaults, which are carved into the local yellow sandstone (panchino). A bust of Lasa was originally carved into this pillar, but grave robbers have removed it. The present-day access was built in the 1800s, the original corridor was oblique to what you know see. The rediscovery of this chamber probably occurred around 1880.bThe second hypogeum, is a quadrangular room, always underground. Access is also through a corridor (dromos) which also slopes steeply downward. The main chamber in fact opens in the back into two additional smaller rooms, these rooms are located on two sides of the quadrangle. The Portone necropolis was used primarily during the Hellenistic age, during this time many of the most important families in Volterra would have had their burials here.

The first Etruscan tomb is characterized by a single circular underground hypogeum (burial chamber), whose access is through a steeply inclined corridor (dromos). Benches have been carved into the soft sedimentary stone, the funerary urns and vases were placed upon these benches. A large central pillar helps support the chambers’ vaults, which are carved into the local yellow sandstone (panchino). A bust of Lasa was originally carved into this pillar, but grave robbers have removed it. The present-day access was built in the 1800s, the original corridor was oblique to what you know see. The rediscovery of this chamber probably occurred around 1880.bThe second hypogeum, is a quadrangular room, always underground. Access is also through a corridor (dromos) which also slopes steeply downward. The main chamber in fact opens in the back into two additional smaller rooms, these rooms are located on two sides of the quadrangle. The Portone necropolis was used primarily during the Hellenistic age, during this time many of the most important families in Volterra would have had their burials here.

Necropoli del portone
A chamber tomb consisting of an underground hypogeum, of quadrangular shape, approached by a very steep crridor (dromos) four side chambers open up along the perimeter of the central vestibule, two of which are along the bach wall. All along the walls of the vestibule and side chambers are benches for funeral containers and other objects. Although the exact time of the discovery is unclear, the tomb was likely excavated around 1880 (dating: hellenistic period end 4th-1st cent. B. C.) A chamber tomb consisting of an underground circular hypogeum approached by a very steep corridor (dromos). The tomb is provided whith a bench for funeral containers (generally, urns and vases) and other objects. A big pillar in the middle of the chamber supports the vault, made from a block of yellow-grey local stone known as “panchino”. Today’s corridor was built in the 19th century from the original one and is placed obliquely as regards. Although the exact time of the discovery is unclear, the tomb was likely excavated around 1880 (dating: hellenistic period end 4th-1st cent. B. C.)

The first Etruscan tomb is characterized by a single circular underground hypogeum (burial chamber), whose access is through a steeply inclined corridor (dromos). Benches have been carved into the soft sedimentary stone, the funerary urns and vases were placed upon these benches. A large central pillar helps support the chambers’ vaults, which are carved into the local yellow sandstone (panchino). A bust of Lasa was originally carved into this pillar, but grave robbers have removed it. The present-day access was built in the 1800s, the original corridor was oblique to what you know see. The rediscovery of this chamber probably occurred around 1880.bThe second hypogeum, is a quadrangular room, always underground. Access is also through a corridor (dromos) which also slopes steeply downward. The main chamber in fact opens in the back into two additional smaller rooms, these rooms are located on two sides of the quadrangle. The Portone necropolis was used primarily during the Hellenistic age, during this time many of the most important families in Volterra would have had their burials here.

The swimming Pool

Inside the farm holidays is a swimming pool of 12x6x1.40 mt, encircled by a wide solarium equipped with beach umbrellas, sun beds, and solar shower. The swimming pool works from May to October and all our guests have free access, for security reasons children must be accompained.

Inside the farm holidays is a swimming pool of 12x6x1.40 mt, encircled by a wide solarium equipped with beach umbrellas, sun beds, and solar shower. The swimming pool works from May to October and all our guests have free access, for security reasons children must be accompained.

FOR YOUR DREAM HOLIDAY

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Villa Marmini

San Michele Villa Marmini II, 25 Volterra (Pi) – Italia
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Mobile: +39 320 116 5129
Mobile: +39 340 722 9551
Write us on Whatsapp at 3201165129
or by Email at info@villa-marmini.com

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